Imagine what this picture would look like from the top!? One day… one day I’ll climb one of these towers ;-) (at Catawba East Tower)

Imagine what this picture would look like from the top!? One day… one day I’ll climb one of these towers ;-) (at Catawba East Tower)

I think my bank has the best customer service reps. After a short conversation about changes in the app, and how easy it would make paying bills with a roommate, he sent me a gif of a puppy! #Simple #banking #awesomecustomerservice

I think my bank has the best customer service reps. After a short conversation about changes in the app, and how easy it would make paying bills with a roommate, he sent me a gif of a puppy! #Simple #banking #awesomecustomerservice

Anonymous asked: Another thing, if you want the whole logging onto someone else's console and then playing the games you own on their console, The PS4 will be doing that with digital games, and since every game will have a day 1 digital download, there is that innovation right there from SONY. I'm saying that if you have great internet and want those digital features, you'll have them, don't support restrictions that take away the choice of people who want physical media.

I had not heard that, but if it is true then congrats for the PS4! I am sure, that for such a thing to work said games would have to be registered somehow and would only be playable on one console at a time (which is exactly what the Xbox One was trying to do). I do want to clear this one thing up though… I am not a Microsoft fanboy, I simply appreciate innovation. Microsoft displayed a desire to break away from the norm and strive for something new. Sony has done so on a smaller scale, but for the most part chose to play it safe. I don’t blame them for that. They are releasing an excellent gaming console and will no doubt have record sales. I am simply saddened by the fact that people were not ready for the changes that Microsoft proposed. That does not mean they are done away with though. I believe, either in a future update or on the next set of consoles, that both companies will venture down that road, as it presents a lot of exciting opportunities for the gaming industry.

Anonymous asked: Discs aren't going to be replaced, there tons of people who buy discs and physical in today's age simply because they want something in their hands. Don't agree with me? Go check forums for blu ray movies, music CD's, books, and video games. Since people want physical goods, there will always be that market and as long as that market still exists, so will physical media. Internet speeds will increase in the future, but companies will milk consumers before they offer better speeds and bandwidth.

But discs WILL eventually be replaced. Those of us that still enjoy having a hard copy of something do so because we grew up that way. It took very little time for the music industry to do away with discs. And if you think gamers are somehow immune to this phenomena I will point you to computer games. No one buys computer games on discs anymore. Besides, going digital has freed developers to offer all kinds of deals and packages that you simply cannot do in stores. Those that have a desire to have collectible items for their games can satisfy themselves with soundtracks, posters, guides, and limited edition hardware. Technology will eventually evolve beyond discs. It is the nature of technology to advance. If you think otherwise that is just foolish.

Anonymous asked: One's proposed sharing policy was a fraud anyway. I'm not sure how anyone believes developers would be so into killing off used games, only to have free games. Even used games pool money back into other sales.

You are referring to their used game policy (the licensing fee) not their sharing policy. The sharing policy allowed for you to share all of your games with up to nine “family members” (can be anyone) for free. The only time it would have cost money would have been when you actually sold the game. However, I agree with you here. That policy would have seriously hurt the used game market. I disagree with you on the matter of whether or not the game developers would have wanted that.
Used games actually do very little for the gaming industry. The developer makes no money on the sale of a used game. Typically, for every new game bought, three or more people are able to play it through to completion. That means that game developers are missing out on two thirds of their sales. The music industry really struggled for a time due to this exact issue. It is only due to the mp3 that small artists are now able to make enough money to stay in the business. I believe, if anything, that the game developers were 100% behind this push for digitizing the games, as they stand to gain a good portion of their sales back.

Anonymous asked: People who buy their games legally shouldn't have to deal with restrictions like they are pirating games. Treating everyone like a pirate isn't the right way to go about it. There are people who can afford internet but choose not to get it simply because they don't want it, they still want to play games and they can with a console not connected to the internet. A device that costs 500 dollars shouldn't rely on the internet to work, if a game requires internet, people can choose not to buy it.

First, the majority of people who play games on their consoles do have internet connection. So for them the issue of logging in daily is a moot issue because they are always connected. For those that do not have internet access, regardless of the limitations of the system, they will be severely limited in what they can play because most games on the next gen consoles will in fact require an internet connection for some or all of their features (look it up before trying to argue this point please so you don’t sound foolish). As for your argument about people who don’t want the internet… they are just plain weird. The only people I know like that are my grandparents. Anyone tech savy enough to play video games will see the benefits of having their own internet access. That is simply the world we live in today.
Second, the benefits (in my opinion) far outweigh any of the concerns that have been raised to date. We would have been able to share our games virtually with up to nine people (one person at a time, just like a regular disc). Also, we would have been able to log in from any Xbox One and access our entire library (games,music, movies, etc.). I was super excited about these features, and they made the $500 price tag seem even better. You have to also take into account that Microsoft did not make the Xbox One into just a gaming console. The Xbox One is a media center all in one. It controls all of your other devices and works with voice and gesture control. Right now there are TV’s on the market that have voice control that is far less intuitive and exponentially more expensive.
While I agree that this change would have been hard to swallow for the consumer, you cannot deny that it was innovative. With the increasing internet speeds and better hardware, discs are dying out. Everything will eventually be digital. Technology is evolving and Microsoft tried to speed things up. Unfortunately, people are prone to argue and don’t like change. So despite the fact that the DRM would not have affected the majority of the people who bought the system, it still got canned. Think about it… would the DRM that Microsoft proposed really have affected your gaming in any noticeable way? For the majority of people who are not afraid to have “the interwebs” in their home the answer is a resounding NO.

Note: I do agree that the $30 “licensing fee” that they had planned for used games sucked big time and would have seriously hurt the used game market.

Xbox One Uproar

What I don’t get is why everyone is in a tizzy over drm… the majority of the gaming community plays their games legally. If you legitimately own your game and are playing your game legally, then it won’t be a problem. Also, who cares if the console requires you to connect to the internet every 24 hours. Am I an oddity in that my console just stays connected? If so, I understand why every is upset… that is a huge burden to have to tell your Xbox One to connect to wifi once a day. But of course, there are those who don’t have internet. That is a completely different issue (and they obviously aren’t the ones complaining on the forums). If you can’t afford internet you probably can’t afford an Xbox One either. That would be like getting upset that you can’t buy car mats if you don’t have a car. At this point in console gaming, if you don’t have internet access your console is going to be very limited in what it can do, not because of drm, but because games are being designed for social play now.

I, for one, am very disappointed in the direction Microsoft has now taken. I was thrilled with their desire to innovate. I was really looking forward to being able to share my games with up to nine people and access my library from any Xbox. Those two concepts were genius! Hopefully, down the road, they will offer a software update that allows users to return their systems to the way they were originally conceived. I have a hunch that in the not too distant future people might warm up to this idea.

And to answer the question about cloud computing… nothing changes. The console did not require an always on connection before. It simply required a drm check every 24 hours. That has nothing to do with the way games are played. It may very well be that you choose to keep your Xbox One connected to the internet anyways, and if a game allows for cloud processing then it will make use of it. Some games will require an internet connection though. This has not changed either. So I don’t understand why everyone is having such a hard time with this question, as the very first part of the question is based on faulty information:

"If the console doesn’t have to be connected online all the time…"

It never did.

Never heard pride described in such a way, but C.J. Mahaney makes it work! We need people in our lives who are willing to hold us accountable even when we don’t think we need it. (at Home)

Never heard pride described in such a way, but C.J. Mahaney makes it work! We need people in our lives who are willing to hold us accountable even when we don’t think we need it. (at Home)

lolsofunny:

arpakassomomma:

captawesomesauce:

What do I do when I’m sick? I google “cat beards” on google images and here were some of the best. 

omfg

(lol here!)

(via lolsofunny)

the-absolute-funniest-posts:

niknak79:

Revenge is sweet

I’m going to have to look into this!

When someone tries to argue with you on a topic you know more about

lolsofunny:

totally-relatable:

image

(lol here!)

(via lolsofunny)

One banana + one cup plain yogurt + one scoop protein + one scoop “future food” (this is what turned it green) + a little bit of vanilla + a little bit of cinnamon = baby puke

One banana + one cup plain yogurt + one scoop protein + one scoop “future food” (this is what turned it green) + a little bit of vanilla + a little bit of cinnamon = baby puke

scissorsandthread:

Swiss Army Key Ring | Instructables
As soon as I saw this DIY it made me think of my dad who hates bulky key rings. Like, I think he has about three keys on a single fob. So I saw this and was like, this would be perfect for him! Father’s day is coming up and I like to make things for dad (and he prefers handmade things) so I think I’m going to try and attempt to make this!

Doing this!!!

scissorsandthread:

Swiss Army Key Ring | Instructables

As soon as I saw this DIY it made me think of my dad who hates bulky key rings. Like, I think he has about three keys on a single fob. So I saw this and was like, this would be perfect for him! Father’s day is coming up and I like to make things for dad (and he prefers handmade things) so I think I’m going to try and attempt to make this!

Doing this!!!

Walk Away

I want to go somewhere new and start over. Just pick up and leave… is that even possible though? Could I really?

Twenty minutes in and still lost in thought...

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Me, Myself, and I

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